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We are sharing with you the vignettes on The Star - a story of John who is a star performer, but causes problems because he refuses to cooperate with his team members. How do you deal with a person like John?

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Discussion:
1. If you were Terry , the superior of John , how would you handle
    the situation?
2. What options should be considered ?
3. Please post your comments and share your experiences.


 
Post   

kitty
June 19, 2013
Enjoyed this one very much!


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claire
February 18, 2013
Tell John as a member of the team, he must conform to the meeting time agreements made by the team. If a subgroup wants to meet with John at a later time. also schedule that one. If John screws up again, Terry needs to enforce discipline and consequences even if he's a star.


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Karen
February 06, 2013
Discuss the timing issues, but remember that John is not indispensable.


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Jan
August 01, 2012
Discuss impact of behavior. Ask what and how questions.


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Jennifer
March 05, 2012
Check for reasons first, if legitimate reason for later time consider rescheduling meeting, if not, then discuss impact of later time on work and others. Ask John for solutions, be active to work it out rather than making him defend his position.


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bradd
March 01, 2012
I agree with the investigate further approach but I'd also explore the possibility that John join in by conference or video call if that is appropriate to the content. Is his physical presence really needed?


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J
September 19, 2011
1. If I were Terry I would Let John Know that he does add a lot of value to the team . However if he is consistently Late his Piers will possibly begin to de-value and he may loose credibility. John appears to be someone who is driven by self worth and recognition. Having him know that he may not be as looked up to or his information may not be as valued would be a start.
2.I would Consider Speaking with John's Team Members and Making a team discission.
If the team is opposed I would have a conversation and Implementation of the importance of his timeless and value to the team of his timeliness.


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Blain
September 12, 2011
It is assumed that there is no business reason for John to be continually late; however, that discussion should be had. If John presents a valid business reason, a specific conflict that causes him to be late, then consideration must be given for a different meeting time. It is assumed there is no valid business reason, which makes it something personal. John needs to understand that all team members have personal issues that they are challenged with juggling to ensure they are on time. With consideration to the entire team, he is expected to arrive on time each week, prepared. I would seek confirmation to his understanding of this request to ensure it doesn’t happen again.

If he is late, then a more serious discussion would be appropriate.



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Amy
August 18, 2011
Terry has obviously discussed this with John before because he told the team that John had suggested an 8:00 start time. Did he ask the team if that would work for them? The present start time is obviously not working. The team becomes frustrated because they waste time waiting for a key contributor. Terry needs to lead the team; not just commiserate with them. Find out why John needs a later start time and, if the reason is valid, communicate that to the team and work it out. This may have worked well if it had been done when this conflict first arose. Now the team will probably resent having to accomodate John.


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Tina
August 17, 2011
He seem very arogant to me. While I could find out why he can't make it. I could probably find someone with the same knowledge without the arogance


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John
August 17, 2011
It seems to me that Terry could/should have addressed this earlier, before it developed to the level of frustration that now exists. Clearly, this is not the first time John is not on time...why didn't Terry ask the "why" question before this? Since Terry has allowed this to continue, he shares in the responsibility and needs to drop the "You have to be kidding.." attitude. Find out why John is not on time, and then base any actions on the legitimacy of the response.


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Provita
August 11, 2011
Have a discussion about why he can't be there at the meeting time. If it's legitimate then we will discuss with the team and allow the team to determine another time that will work for all. If it's not legitimate, then I would explain yes his feedback is valuable and that's why he, like all of us, are expected to be there at the established time and on time. Everyone has feedback that we all need to be there to hear and possibly discuss, unless someone's out unexpectantly. It is also a time of team building and as a part of the team, he needs to be there.


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Paul
August 11, 2011
I like the option #3 to find out first why John can't make it at 8:00. If there is a solid reason, I would go with it and announce it at the team. I would also ask at that time if others need any special acccomodations. If the reasons are pure laziness and star status, I would ask him to conform or provide the data in writing or using some other method to get his input.


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Linda
August 11, 2011
I agree that some effort should be put into finding out what exactly is the reason John cannot make the earlier meeting time. While no one should be indispensable on a team, I am sure we have all been involved in teams where there are those with information and experience that is very pertinent to the outcome of a meeting. By starting the meeting without John may seem worth it, consider the time it will take to catch him up on the discussion, then if he does have information that could change the outcome -- then that ˝ hour has been a waste of the entire team.


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Kathy
August 10, 2011
As the manager, Terry needs to put his annoyance with John aside and deal with the behaviors that exist. If there is not a substantial reason for a 7:30 am start time for this particular meeting, maybe it needs to change. Terry could start by raising the importance of having John's input and knowledge at the table for the meeting and asking why the 7:30 am start time is not working. Whether John is a single parent, a parent who is just trying to do his share, or has issues with children, wife, partner or aging parents - there may be legitimate reasons why he is unable to arrive for this early meeting time. Find out the reason and then work to negotiate a different start time - or day - for the meeting. Or - to identify someone who would be able to fill this role for the current meeting time. Or, if possible, to negotiate John arriving early for this particular meeting/day - and possibly trading off some time of interest to John (late another day, off early a day,etc.) We need to recognize that employees have other commitments and responsibilities and not let an arbitrary meeting time get in the way.


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Angie
August 10, 2011
I would ask what it is that makes 8 better. Does he drop off his kids at school? If that is the case, maybe starting at 8 is not so bad. Do you want to lose him?


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ana
August 10, 2011
first of all we have to recognize that it is a wonderful thing to have a star in our team. as many star as it is possible. often we just forget to say it clearly or we avoid saying it, as if not recognizing it, the non productive behaviour would vanish. we must build action plans with each star to help him/her become a even bigger star. plans aligned with team goals, rules and values. a big star arrives on time. punctuality is the politeness of kings.


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Joe
August 10, 2011
[T] "If you can sell the group on starting at eight, 8 o'clock is fine with me. The problem is that starting this late disrupts everyone's day. [pause] For this week, I'll insist that they accommodate you. After that, the majprity will rule. What can I do to help you sell them? [pause] Any logistic reasons?"

posted by: Jimenez Ray
August 10, 2011
Joe, Thanks. We will check this out and improve it. Ray

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Linda
August 10, 2011
Exploring why the early start time is a problem is an important first step. Whether John's need is legitimate or not - he needs to take responsibility to the rest of the team. It is unacceptable to squander other people's time by showing up late - the business cost in time and team dynamics is too high. I would plan to have him bring his request to the rest of the team and negotiate for a different meeting time - it is one way to bring everyone's needs to the table face to face. Mutual respect is critical for this manager to establish with the team. I would introduce the agenda item, set the stage for making a decision that is best for the group as a whole and then ask John to make his case. Perhaps the group can solve the problem without it becoming a managment issue.


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Yolanda
August 10, 2011
Terry should inquire more about John's reasoning for insisting the meeting start at 8:00; not to badger him, but to find out if John has other issues. If John does have other pressing issues (single dad, have to take kids to school, wife is sick at home, etc.) that causes him to not start until 8:00 am then Terry can make the call to either place John on another project or move the meetings back to accommodate his home-life situation. I would also ensure John his feedback is valuable and is needed for the project to go further if the meeting is pushed back to accommodate him.

posted by: Jimenez Ray
August 10, 2011
Yolanda, I agree with you. Too often we become too business focused forgetting there are reasons in our personal lives which impacts work behavior. Thanks, Ray

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