About Vignettes Learning
   
Learners' Edge
StoryImpacts
Scenario & Story-Based Content Development
Contact & Support

 
 
 Login
  Username
 
  Password
 
 
  Forgot Password
 Join Now
Discussion, get free link & iFrame
 
Wrong Send-Bad Message   Join us  
How to Use the Vignette

This vignette, "Wrong Send-Bad Message", recounts  how Paul, a young manager, gets frustrated with his boss, Doug. In his anger, Paul sends a text message to a friend but ends up being received by Doug instead! He  finds out that...
Free link & iFrame
Discussion
1.Does Doug have a right to confront Paul about  his accusations in the text message?  What positive steps/actions should he take?
2.If you were Paul, what would you do if confronted  by your boss or the moment you realize your mistake?
3.Please help others learn from your insights by posting a comment.


 
Post   

Anna
September 27, 2016
Doug should try to work it out with Paul. You don't want an employee with underlying issues to continue to work for you.


Reply  


Heather
December 13, 2013
I believe that Doug has a right to call a meeting with Paul about the accusations, but he must also be willing to listen to why Paul sent that message and think about ways that he can improve his skills to mitigate such feelings in the future.


Reply  


Heather
December 13, 2013
This should be interesting to review with fellow employees. It's a situation similar to hitting "Reply All" to an email and sending something you only intended for one person or replying to the wrong person in an email.


Reply  


Patricia
April 03, 2013
Doug should confront Paul with a problem-solving approach. For example, he could ask Paul to suggest ways to make the meeting more productive. Paul could be proactive in apologizing to Doug for the slurs and requesting a follow-up meeting.


Reply  


Katharine
March 17, 2013
Many implications here about technology and communication and classic communication theory.


Reply  


claire
February 18, 2013
Great example of misplaced anger. Doug is angered by Paul's distorted thinking "never listens". Both guys need to handle this conflict face to face, forgive and move on.


Reply  


Karen
February 06, 2013
I think Paul should apologize but at the same time Doug should consider what prompted Paul to feel frustrated.


Reply  


Bonnie
April 10, 2012
Yes Paul should apologize! It is better to step up and own your mistakes than try to hide from them. Hopefully, it will provide an opportunity for Paul and Doug to have a meaningful dialogue about this incident and other things that may have contributed to his frustration.


Reply  


Tammy
February 13, 2012
Confrontation is not a bad thing


Reply  


Eric
October 24, 2011
Paul: Hey, Doug, I accidentally sent you a text on (name of day). Did you get it?
Doug: Yes/No (sometimes text msg get lost in the void)
Paul: No, well I was just expressing some fustration. Yesterday, I came up with an idea to make our meetings shorter. Do you have minute to talk about it?
Paul: Yes, I am sorry if it hurt your feelings. It was not meant for you. I was just expressing some fustration because I really wanted to go to the game. However, the situation did give me an idea on how we could make meetings shorter. Do you have a minute to discuss that?


Reply  


Zareer
October 16, 2011
Doug has a right to approach Paul about the accusations. Maybe it would add a little more understanding between the two.
Knowing that doug got my message as Paul I would go over to doug and discuss the same with him.


Reply  


Kate
October 12, 2011
1. I think Doug absolutely has a right to approach Paul about the errant message. I would suggest he cool down and give Paul 48 hours to own up to his mistake. But if Paul remains silent, Doug can look at this as an opportunity to discuss Paul's frustration and ask Paul for suggestions as to how he might have handled the meeting better. He can also ask Paul (who is employee of the year) for ideas about delegation. Finally, he can encourage Paul to approach him directly the next time he has trouble with Doug's management. I think this can be handled with kindness and even a sense of humor (assuming Doug has his ego in check).
2. If I were Paul, as soon as I determined the message was sent in error, I would think about how best to approach Doug about it. I would apologize for not approaching him directly at first. I would also try to address my initial frustrations in more balanced language.

posted by: Walsh Sharon
January 31, 2012
Excellent suggestion!
posted by: Walsh Sharon
January 31, 2012
Excellent suggestion!

Reply  


page 1 of 1

 

Back to top

 
 
 
 
About Vignettes Learning | Scenarios & Stories | Systems | Innovations | Contact Support
Vignettes Learning 2017