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Learners Don`t Know What They Don`t Know   Join us  
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In the vignette for the week - "Learners Don't Know What They Don't Know", George, a team manager, is furious because Linda,  a team member,  did not strictly follow his instructions. George predicts the team will lose a client and blames...
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1. Do you recall someone like George in your own work environment? How should a person like George be dealt with?

2. After the embarrassing situation George had to go through, what do you suggest he does to address the situation?


 
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Vicki
August 25, 2014
Yes, I believe we've all countered similar situations and unfortunately frustrations.


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Mary
April 16, 2014
This should spur an interesting discussion.


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Katharine
March 17, 2013
George clearly values his own ego more than he does the team or clients. I predict that someday Linda will be the team leader!


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Karen
January 28, 2013
1. I have worked for someone like George. If a superior knows, he/she should "remind" George that he is ultimately responsible for anything good or bad that develops on his team. If a new member needs training, and most will need it from time to time, it should be provided. If you can't help assuming, assume the best, knowing we all need to grow somewhere (you, too).
2. Apologize sincerely, praise her specifically (what the client said), and tell her you can't help but trust her after the glorious comments given to her. Finish with "Our team is all the better for having you!"


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Gerry
October 24, 2012
Nice examples.


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karen
August 01, 2012
Yes, I recall someone like George. Although he might apologise, try to appreciate Linda's work & allow her more responsibility I would suggest to Linda to go with her gut feeling about how much she can gain while being around a self-absorbed boss like him. To also make a plan, go for it and leave when achieved. These kind of people are typically hard work & cause unneccesary stress which sucks one's energy rather than replenish. Having said that, Linda can still gain wisdom from the situation which should serve her well next time she comes across a similar situation. Furthermore, there will come a time to move on and it's highly likely to be sooner than later. So George loses out & be none the wiser!


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Shirley
March 04, 2012
Yes there are always people around who will think that others know less than what he realises. A person like George needs to realise from his mistake, correct his behaviour and develop some strategies to ensure he does not find himself in this situation again. Perhaps asking some clarifying questions before making a miscalculated judgement would do the trick.


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Christy
February 03, 2012
George should meet with Linda and apologize for his outburst. Then let her know that she is doing an outstanding job and thank her for her efforts to keep the contract. George sounds like he is burnt out and needs to re-energize his thinking and management skills.


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Eric
February 01, 2012
Also all interactions with clients are learning opportunities, if George does not give Linda the latitude to learn from successes/failures/risky situations/decisions than Linda should quit because she will not be allowed to grow as an employee underneath George. She will only be a puppet of George.


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Eric
February 01, 2012
It could be that Linda accidentally did not follow George's instructions and the situation just happened to turn out good for the client. George made the mistack of judging Linda's actions before the outcome was known. Perhaps, George should apologize to Linda and request that she talk with him when she would like to make certain modifications to instructions so that together they can think about it. It could be that Lina's idea/accident/discovery could lead to changes in future instructions. Additionally, giving employees a bit of latitude is necessary so they do not think of themselves as being puppets (extensions of the boss). Otherwise, they will begin to think "well why don't you do it yourself since I can only do exactly what you tell me." Finally, George should determine whether the deviation from instructions was Linda trying to deal with a fast changing situation or did Linda have time to think about it and talk with him. If the decision needed to be fast than Linda's ability should be encouraged. If there was time to think than perhaps it might be good to talk with her about everyone needing to be on the same page and he values her ideas and would like to discuss them in the future to see if policies need to be modified.


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Carey
January 24, 2012
Apologize fast and first, that's my rule. The way you handle yourself after making a mistake tells a lot about your character. If you handle it right, you could end up making the relationship stronger than if you never made the mistake. And try and see it from the mistake-maker's point of view. Was it deliberate? Was it an "innocent mistake"?


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Leona
January 04, 2012
He should definitely apologize. Humility is definitely missing with a lot of our leaders today. Ego rules their teams and it causes mistakes to be made and excellent employees to be lost - admit that she knew how to handle this and apologize and praise her


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brenda
January 04, 2012
I have seen this type of situation, especially when it comes to a new employee.


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